Journal of Management Information and Decision Sciences (Print ISSN: 1524-7252; Online ISSN: 1532-5806)

Research Article: 2021 Vol: 24 Issue: 1S

Assessment of Local People about Trade Village Tourism in My an Pottery Village, Mang Thit District, Vinh Long Province

Le Thi To Quyen, School of Social Sciences & Humanities, Can Tho Univesity

Nguyen Thi My Duyen, An Giang University, Vietnam National University of HCM City

Ly My Tien, School of Social Sciences & Humanities, Can Tho Univesity

Nguyen Thi Huynh Phuong, School of Social Sciences & Humanities, Can Tho Univesity

Nguyen Thi Be Ba, School of Social Sciences & Humanities, Can Tho Univesity

Phan Ngoc Truong Khanh, School of Social Sciences & Humanities, Can Tho Univesity

Nguyen Phuong Thanh, School of Social Sciences & Humanities, Can Tho Univesity

Citation Information: Quyen, L.T.T., Duyen, N.T.M., Tien, L.M., Phuong, N.T.H., Ba, N.T.B., Khanh, P.N.T., & Thanh, N.P. (2021). Assessment of local people about trade village tourism in my an pottery village, mang thit district, vinh long province. Journal of Management Information and Decision Sciences, 24(S1), 1-14.

Keywords

My an Pottery Village, Craft Village Tourism, Vinh Long Tourism

Abstract

 The purpose of this article is to examine the perceptions of local residents regarding the factors affecting tourism development in My An pottery village. From there, some tourism development strategies and solutions for craft villages are proposed. The results of a survey of 150 people in My pottery village show that the craft village has numerous potentials and favorable conditions for tourism development. According to research, there are seven factors that influence tourism development in My pottery village, with "Tourism promotion and development policy" being the most influential. Similarly, the author has provided some recommendations and solutions for developing tourism in my pottery village.

Introduction

Craft villages are critical to rural economies. Additionally, traditional craft villages contribute significantly to job creation, income growth, and overall quality of life, while also changing the face of rural areas and preserving cultural identity regional customs. Not only do the products of craft villages have economic value, but they also have cultural significance; traditional craft villages serve as a repository for tangible and intangible cultural heritage. a vibrant, diverse, and highly specific expression of Vietnamese cultural identity. A current trend among tourists, particularly international visitors, is to learn about the unique cultural identity of the area to which they travel, particularly by visiting traditional craft villages to learn about the culture, how the product is made, and even to participate in the manufacturing process. The craft village's comprehensive development will transform it into an attractive tourist destination. Traditional handicraft products created on-site in the craft village become valuable souvenirs, quickly establishing a significant and effective market. The development of craft villages and their integration with tourism will contribute to honoring, preserving, and widely disseminating the nation's traditional cultural values.

Vinh Long - a province in the Mekong Delta - is highly regarded for its potential for eco-tourism development, owing to the river region's unique natural conditions, fruit-laden orchards, and tourist resorts and homestays where visitors can experience the world's unique beauty. Activities akin to those found in the West, such as fishing and river boating. Apart from this potential, Vinh Long's traditional craft villages are diverse and prosperous. Among them is a long-established craft village known as My An pottery village in Vinh Long province's Mang Thit district. The ceramics here are quite different from those found in other pottery villages, being unglazed red pottery with a simple and natural appearance, as well as the image of extremely ancient burning furnace roofs. By the Co Chien river, it is tens of kilometers long. As a result, Vinh Long is dubbed the Mekong Delta's "Red Kingdom." These are significant tourism assets that have the potential and advantages of connecting craft villages with tourism development, thereby attracting tourists, particularly foreign tourists, due to their long-term cultural values. life and how to make traditional indigenous handicrafts. As such, it should be utilized to aid in the development of tourism in Mang Thit district in particular and Vinh Long province in general.

Although the province is committed to the preservation and promotion of traditional craft villages. However, My An pottery village faces challenges such as a lack of raw materials and labor, insufficient capital to invest in technological innovation and production scale expansion, and so on. Additionally, this traditional craft village has not been exploited or developed to its full potential. This craft village has not been linked to tourism in order to develop into craft village tourism, but it is also a distinct activity unconnected to tourism companies, etc. Simultaneously, information and images about these traditional craft villages, as well as their value, have been overlooked in the promotion and promotion of tourism activities. Additionally, it is for this reason that the craft village faces the threat of gradual extinction. Therefore, determining the factors affecting tourism development in My An pottery village is a critical requirement for contributing to the village's potential and value maximization. preserving craft villages from extinction and contributing to the local community's socioeconomic development, as well as improving people's lives in craft villages.

The purpose of this study is to ascertain the public's perceptions of craft village tourism in My An pottery village.

(i) Assessment of the tourism development potential and current state of My An pottery village.

(ii) An examination of the factors influencing the development of tourism in the My An pottery village.

(iii) Proposing solutions for the development of My An pottery village through tourism

Literature Review

According to Mustafa (2011), with the study "Potential of Sustainable Handicrafts as a Tourism Product in Jordan - Potential to maintain handicrafts as a Jordanian tourism product." The author has stated that handicrafts are an integral part of the tourism industry, represent local traditions and indigenous peoples, and are also a valuable souvenir. Many countries benefit from the handicraft industry because it provides income and job opportunities to the community, but benefits vary from country to country. This research paper aims to explore the reasons for poor performance; aspects of development, strengths and weaknesses were explored, suggesting improving the contribution of crafts to Jordanian tourism.

According to Shushma (2012), the study "Tourism and Handicraft - Exploring Connections - Tourism and Handicrafts - Discovering Connections." This research focuses on the natural link between crafts and tourism. The author also affirmed that tourism and crafts are closely linked to common building and promotion interests. The basic link between crafts and tourism resonates particularly well in ancient trading, human settlement and rich culture. Research focuses on economic benefit issues; preserving cultural heritage; expectations of visitors; connecting artisans with the tourism market; role of the private sector; scope and benefits for the private sector; role of volunteer donors; role of government. Then the author concludes that the value of crafts also includes suppliers of raw materials, distributors, transporters, and sellers who will benefit from tourism industry development. The private sector, funders, government, and academic community must work together with artisans to realize this potential.

Regards to Hengky (2015), with the study "Beneficial images: Yogyakarta Batik handicraft tourism, Indonesia - Beneficial images: Yogyakarta Batik handicraft tourism, Indonesia. This study aimed to respond to art writers' claims by exploring the performance of beneficial images on Yogyakarta's Batik handicraft tourism. This quantitative study was carried out in Yogyakarta for one year from July 2013-July 2014. Randomly, stratified sampling, triangulation and content-based analysis were collected by distributing 300 questionnaires to 100 respondents. This study found that tourism activities in Batik have beneficial visual power for tourists. It turns out most tourists consider Yogyakarta because of Batik's beneficial effects. Every tourist experience becomes very important and part of beneficial visual attributes: a sense of place, infrastructure, culture, types, services and numbers standards. Printing times. Tourist's main beneficial image of batik tourism: Social tourism becomes the first tourist attraction; the originality of batik handicrafts, embodying philosophy and interpretation; some conditions and emotions influence their decisions.

According to Chuntao, et al., (2018), in the study "Effects of tourism on the development of the handicrafts industry during the earthquake recovery process in Beichuan, China — the influence of tourism on the development of the handicrafts industry during the earthquake recovery process in Beichuan, China. Recovery from Sichuan Earthquake, China." This study shows the impact of tourism development on the innovation and diversification of ethnic crafts in the newly developed tourist disaster area - Beichuan Qiang Tourist Area, Sichuan, China. Sichuan was one of the earthquake's hardest hit areas on May 12, 2008. Fieldwork included site visits, engagement, observations, and semi-structured elite interviews. Methods used in this study were local flowers and tourist surveys. The results indicate that tourism development has led to diversification of the handicraft industry and is now reshaping the embroidery industry. Local businesses are of the opinion to reduce costs and adjust products to increase revenue. The higher quality and authenticity of embroidered products should be highlighted so that tourists can see the reason for higher prices of local handmade products.

Robert, et al., (2018), with the study: "Changing ceramic traditions in the ancestral village of Agila, Hood Bay, Papua New Guinea - Changing ceramic traditions in Agila village, Hood Bay, Papua New Guinea." New Guinea's recent announcement is full of commercial archeological and graphic evidence, indirectly connecting virtually the entire country from the coast to the highlands. One result is a bias towards central locations (e.g. Mailu Island) or large manufacturing villages (e.g. Port Moresby area) as the origin of decomposed goods. In contrast, attention was also paid to receiving points, far in the landscape (e.g. the Gulf of Papua lowlands) where traders came back to their home villages of origin. Unpaying attention to extremes where networks connect indirectly. Here we present new evidence from Hood Bay on Papua New Guinea's southern coast, an area located at the crossroads between Motuhiri sailing west and Mailu Island potters east and that seafaring trade, Hood Bay is geographically well-positioned to investigate variable inter-regional maritime network constructions along an extensive coastline. We present preliminary excavation results at the Agila village site, Hood Bay, where the western Motu and Mailu ceramics were altered. The results indicated that Hood Bay villagers had reorganized alliances and reached regimes and influence, depending on conditions beyond their Western and Eastern visions. The main method of this research is archeology in sites such as Hood Bay, Agila, the results of which found pieces of ceramic objects with different shapes, important information for care and preservation a formal interview process has collected and archived proper curating of contemporary ceramics.

According to Hülya & Yonca (2018) in the study "Conserving Traditional Olive Oil Mills in Cyprus" This paper presents important features of Cyprus' rural landscape and aims to develop conservation proposals. It focuses on olive mills in the Karpas villages, mainly maintaining rural mills and dense olive groves. Study factors: environment, manufacturing method, material deterioration, animal destruction and human factors. Research results show that 2 of the studied plants were restored and reused as a museum to attract tourists with this area's natural beauty and the olive oil industry itself...

Overall, there have been numerous studies on the current situation and solutions to develop craft villages in Vietnam and worldwide. However, the above studies focus only on introducing, highlighting the potential as well as the current situation, inadequacies, evaluating and providing development solutions without going into the issue of exploiting the future value of craft villages. Develop tourism to create a new type of tourism, village craft tourism.

Methodology

The study was conducted by conducting a questionnaire-based direct survey of residents of the My An pottery village.

- Survey methods and questionnaire-based surveys: Primary data are gathered through a survey questionnaire distributed to 150 residents of My An pottery village. In a convenient manner, non-probability sampling. Three major sections comprise the questionnaire:

+ Part 1: This section collects demographic information about residents of the craft village, such as their name, age, gender, marital status, level of education, length of residence in the area, participation in non-tourism activities, whether the family engages in other economic activities, the number of family members and number of people employed in pottery making, and the average monthly income.

+ Part 2: Using seven criteria and twenty-five observed variables, this section assesses the factors influencing tourism development in My An pottery village. The criteria are quantified using a five-point Likert scale: (1) strongly disagree, (2) strongly disagree, (3) neutral, (4) agree, and (5) strongly agree.

+ Part 3: This section includes questions that assess the overall development of tourism in My An pottery village, Vinh Long province.

Following the questionnaire design, the author determines the appropriate sample size and sampling method for the research model.

+ Amount of data collected: The sample size required for a study is determined by a variety of factors, including the data processing method used and the level of reliability required (Nguyen Dinh Tho, 2011). When conducting factor analysis, Hachter, et al., (1994) recommend a sample size of at least five times the observed variable, whereas Gorsuch (1983) recommends a sample size of at least 200 observations. Hoang Trong & Chu-Nguyen (2005) recommend that when analyzing factors, the sample size be at least four or five times the number of variables. Hoyle (1995); cited by Li & Uysal in Sirakaya-Turk, et al., (2011) recommended a sample size of at least 100 to 200 for empirical studies. In accordance with the researchers' recommendations. In order to conduct research and assess the current situation in the area, the research team will select 150 residents of My An pottery village as their target sample. To determine the factors influencing tourism development in My An pottery village (Hair et al., 2006; cited by Nguyen Dinh Tho, 2011), this study employs exploratory factor analysis. A sample size of at least 50 should be used for exploratory factor analysis, and a sample size (n) of 100 is preferable. The author conducted direct interviews with 150 people in My An pottery village based on the recommendations of researchers and the current situation in the area.

+ Sampling technique: For the research, the author employs a non-probability sampling technique known as convenient sampling, also referred to as random sampling. This technique selects the elements for the sample at random. Through this method of sampling, research will be more accessible, saving both time and money.

+ Analytical method: After collecting all 150 survey questionnaires from villagers in the craft village, the author filtered and entered the data using SPSS version 26.0 software (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences). The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics (Frequencies Statistics), scale reliability analysis (Scale Reliability Analysis), exploratory factor analysis (Exploratory Factor Analysis), and multivariate linear regression analysis (Multivariate Linear Regression Analysis). ANOVA (One-Way), Multiple Linear Regression Analysis.

Results

Overview of the Research Area

My An Pottery Village is located on the banks of the Co Chien River in Vinh Long province's Mang Thit district, approximately 10 kilometers northwest of Vinh Long city center. The commune covers a total of 1,314.46 hectares of natural land. The area of clay that can be exploited and manufactured into bricks, tiles, and ceramics is distributed evenly among the commune's hamlets. My An red pottery is a subtle fusion of Mekong Delta aesthetics and traditional culture. Clay is used to make pottery, and rice husk is used as fuel - a by-product of agriculture that is extremely popular in the Mekong Delta. After firing, the ceramic takes on the color of natural red and white veined alum soil, which is one of the distinguishing characteristics of this village in comparison to other glazed pottery villages. According to 2020 statistics, My An has 31 brick-ceramic manufacturing facilities with an annual average output of 14.1 million bricks and 71,280 ceramic products. Currently, in addition to the village's signature product, unglazed red ceramic, a variety of other products such as cement ceramics, antique imitation ceramics, decorative enamel ceramics... are available for the red pottery village in Vinh Long. The craft village's products have been sold in Europe, America, Australia, and a few Asian countries: Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Japan.

Currently, My An pottery village faces numerous challenges, including obtaining raw materials, training skilled workers and artisans, innovating equipment technology, and organizing and strengthening production linkages. Adapting appropriately to changing circumstances, diversifying products and seeking new markets in the trend toward international economic integration, and so forth. While the province is committed to preserving and promoting traditional craft villages and utilizing them for tourism purposes, these traditional craft villages have not been exploited or developed to their full potential. Additionally, this craft village has not been linked to tourism in order to develop into craft village tourism, but it is also a discrete activity that is not linked to tourism companies, which makes the craft village dangerous. The body gradually deteriorates, deteriorates.

Sample Size of Surveyors

The respondents' demographic characteristics included age, sex, marital status, education level, time spent in the community, and participation in pottery artisans. There are no tourism activities, no experience with pottery making, no other economic activities for the family, the total number of family members, the total number of people involved in pottery making, and the average monthly income.

According to the survey questionnaire's statistical results, there is an inordinate amount of gender disparity, with 37.3% males and 62.7% females. The majority of artisans surveyed are female, as the nature of their work necessitates precision and dexterity. The majority of artisans surveyed are between the ages of 30 and 59, accounting for 82.7% of the total sample. 93.3% are married, live in a stable environment, and are residents of their community. The highest rate was 95.3% for those with a high school diploma or less, followed by 3.3% for those with a college degree. The education level of workers in ceramic production establishments is low due to the majority of labor being performed on foot or by hand. The interviewed artisans have lived in the neighborhood for more than 30 years, accounting for 74%, followed by those aged 21 to 30, who account for 9.3%, and those aged 5 to 10, who account for 6.7%, 4.7%, and 5.3%, respectively. Tourism is not a universal activity. The majority of artisans interviewed have between 5 and 10 years of experience making pottery, accounting for 38.7%, followed by those with between 11 and 20 years, accounting for 33.3%, and those with less than 5 years accounting for less than 5%. Those with between 21 and 30 years, and those with more than 5 years, account for 22%, 2.0%, and 6.0%, respectively. Four economic activities and one other case are included in the sample (according to in-depth interviews with craft village artisans, the other case chosen by the respondents is equivalent to "not participating" in any economic activity other than pottery making). Whereas other economic activities such as gardening, trading, and trading account for the highest rate of 92%, farming accounts for 4.7%, and the remaining economic activities such as gardening, trading, and trading account for 2.7%, 0.7%, respectively. Thus, it demonstrates that the primary economic activity of artisans in My An pottery village is still pottery making. The number of participants is two out of every five family members, accounting for the highest rate of 49.3%; the remainder is the number of people participating in pottery making out of every five family members, accounting for the proportions of 1, 3, 4, and 5.387.7%, 9.3%, 0.7%, and 2.0%, respectively. The income of the artisans interviewed ranges from three to five million dollars, accounting for 68.7%, followed by an average income of five to seven million dollars, accounting for 16.0%; the remainder is income. The average income is less than three million dollars, between seven and ten million dollars, and more than ten million dollars, accounting for 2.7%, 7.3%, and 5.3%, respectively.

Factors Affecting the Exploitation of My an Pottery Village in Tourism Development in Mang Thit District, Vinh Long Province

The author conducts exploratory factor analysis using seven criteria and twenty-five measurement variables to ascertain the factors affecting tourism development in My An pottery village, Mang Thit district, Vinh Long province. Which includes the following: (1) Tourism resources (5 variables); (2) Infrastructure – material and technical (4 variables); (3) Security order – environmental sanitation (3 variables); (4) Human resources (4 measurement variables); (5) Consumption market (3 measurement variables); (6) The disappearance of craft villages (3 variables); and (7) Tourism promotion and development policy (3 variables).

To ensure the scale's reliability and that of the observed variables, the author employs the scale's reliability assessment method. Cronbach's Alpha coefficient is used to determine the scales' reliability. Cronbach's Alpha is used to eliminate "superfluous" variables. Variables with a correlation coefficient total of less than 0.3 will be omitted (Nunnally, 1978; Peterson, 1994; Slater, 1995). When the Cronbach's Alpha coefficient is greater than 0.6, the scale is considered reliable. Seven scales are found to be reliable, and no observed variables are excluded from the model.

Cronbach's coefficient for the scale "Criteria for tourism resources" is 0.864, and five variables have variable correlation coefficients - the total correction ranges from 0.658 to 0.705. As a result, no variables are left out of the model.

Cronbach's coefficient for the scale "Criteria for infrastructure - material and technical" is 0.925, and four variables have variable correlation coefficients ranging from 0.807 to 0.848. As a result, no variables are left out of the model.

Cronbach's coefficient for the scale "security order - environmental sanitation" is 0.892, and three variables have variable correlation coefficients ranging from 0.683 to 0.889. As a result, no variables are left out of the model.

Cronbach's coefficient for the scale "Human resource criteria" is 0.829, and four variables have variable correlation coefficients - the total correction ranges from 0.599 to 0.709. As a result, no variables are left out of the model.

Cronbach's coefficient for the scale "Consumption market criteria" is 0.819, and three variables have variable correlation coefficients - the total correction ranges from 0.616 to 0.725. As a result, no variables are left out of the model.

Cronbach's coefficient for the scale "Criteria for the extinction of craft villages" is 0.698, and three variables have variable correlation coefficients - the total correction ranges from 0.471 to 0.553. As a result, no variables are left out of the model.

Cronbach's coefficient for the scale "Criteria for tourism promotion and development policy" is 0.848, and three variables have variable correlation coefficients ranging from 0.685 to 0.766. As a result, no variables are left out of the model. (Table 1)

Table 1
Reliability Scales and Characteristic Variables
Number Scales Feature variable Cronbach’s α
1 Criteria for tourism resources X1, X2, X3, X4, X5 0,864
2 Infrastructure - material and technical criteria X6, X7, X8, X9 0,925
3 Criteria for order, security, and environmental hygiene X10, X11, X12 0,892
4 Criteria for human resources X13, X14, X15, X16 0,829
5 Criteria for the consumer market X17, X18, X19 0,819
6 Criteria for the demise of craft villages X20, X21, X22 0,698
7 Criteria for policies on tourism promotion and development X23, X24, X25 0,848

Thus Table 2, after evaluating the reliability of the scale, there are 7 scales of independent factors with 25 observed variables eligible to conduct exploratory factor analysis. Data testing results show that KMO=0.835; Sig=0.000; total explanatory variance=73.808%; Initial Eigenvalues coefficient is 1,038>0.1 satisfying the conditions for exploratory factor analysis..

Table 2
KMO and Bartlett's Test
KMO 0.835
Bartlett's Test Approx. Chi-Square 6719.157
df 300
Sig. 0.000

According to the rotation factor matrix, seven factors influence the development of tourism in My An pottery village, Mang Thit district, Vinh Long province.

Factor 1

Factor 1 contains the following variables: Tourists participate in the process of making ceramic products (X3); Craft village products have distinct and unique characteristics (X2); The locality's traditional cultural identity is preserved (X4); Ceramic products are diverse and rich in design (X1); The process of making ceramic products is distinct and unique (X1) (X5). This factor is referred to as "Tourism Resources."

Factor 2

Factor 2 includes the following variables: the craft village is located near Vinh Long province's tourist attractions (X7); the craft village is located near the main road system, making it easily accessible (X6); the craft village is located near eating establishments (X8); and the craft village is equipped with electricity and water systems to ensure tourism development (X9). This factor is sometimes referred to as "Infrastructure – technical material."

Factor 3

Local people are friendly and welcoming (X13); local people are unaware of the role and orientation of tourism development in their community (X15); local people have limited ability to communicate in foreign languages (X16); and local people have knowledge and understanding of craft villages (X14). This factor may be referred to as "Human Resources."

Factor 4

Factor 4 consists of the following variables: The pottery village's security is guaranteed (X11); the collected and treated waste is in good condition (X12); and there is no phenomenon of attracting customers at the ceramic production facilities (X10). This factor is sometimes referred to as "Security order - environmental sanitation."

Factor 5

Factor 5 includes the following variables: Tourism in craft villages is unrelated to travel agencies (X24); The majority of tourists learn about the pottery village through traditional advertising channels (X23); Local governments have policies encouraging the development of craft village tourism (X25). This factor is sometimes referred to as "Tourism Promotion and Development Policy."

Factor 6

Factor 6 includes the following variables: People transition from pottery making to other occupations (X20); There is a lack of training and skill development classes (X22); The younger generation lacks enthusiasm for pottery (X21). This factor may be referred to as "the demise of the craft village."

Factor 7
The following variables are included in Factor 7: Increased competition from modern ceramics (X18); Limited exploitation of pottery villages for tourism development (X19); Precarious market for product consumption (X17). This factor is referred to as the "Consumer Market."

Thus, after assessing the scale's reliability and analyzing exploratory factors, we obtained seven scales representing the factors affecting tourism development in My An pottery village. Table 06 contains a summary. (Table 3)

Table 3
Total Factor List (Model Through Cronbach's Α Test And Exploratory Factor Analysis)
Number Scales Feature variable Scale explanation
1 F1 X3, X2, X4, X1, X5 Tourism resources
2 F2 X7, X6, X8, X9 Infrastructure – material and technology
3 F3 X13, X15, X16, X14 Human resources
4 F4 X11, X12, X10 Security order - environmental hygiene
5 F5 X24, X23, X25 Tourism promotion and development policy
6 F6 X20, X22, X21 The disappearance of the craft village
7 F7 X18, X19, X17 Consumption market

To ascertain the number of variables affecting the tourism development model in My An pottery village and the magnitude of each factor's impact, a multivariable linear regression analysis method is used. The data tests indicate that the adjusted R2 value in the model summary table is 0.522 (Table 4), indicating that the independent variable has a 52.2 % influence on the dependent variable; the Sig value of the F test in the ANOVA table is 0.000; the Variance Exaggeration Factor (VIF) of the factors in the Coefficients Table 5; and the first-order series correlation coefficient (Durbin-Watson).

Table 4
Model Summary
R R2 Adjusted R Square Standard error of the estimate First order series correlation
0,729 0,531 0,522 0,46026 1,717
Table 5
Analysis of Variance (Anova)
Model Sum of squares Df Average squared F Sig.
1 Regression 93,960 7 13,423 63,363 0,000
Remainder 83,042 142 0,212
Total 177,002 149

The analysis results in Table 09 indicate that seven factors, in decreasing order, influence the development of tourism in My An pottery village: factor 5 ("Tourism promotion and development policy"), factor 3 ("Human Resources"), factor 6 ("Death of craft villages"), factor 7 ("Consumer Market"), factor 1 ("Tourism Resources"), factor 4 ("Security order – environmental sanitation"), and factor 2 ("Infrastucture"). We have the following equation for multivariable linear regression:

Y=0,542+0,301F5+0, 120F3+0,106F6+0,098F7+0,085F1+0,073F4+0,057F2

The coefficient of factor F5 is 0.301, indicating a positive relationship with the general rating scale "General assessment of tourism development in My An pottery village." When villagers increased their rating for the factor "Policy for tourism promotion and development," their assessment of tourism development in My An pottery village increased by 0.301 points, according to the following system: Correlation coefficients are unnormalized at 0.301.

The coefficient of factor F3 is 0.120, and it has a positive relationship with the general rating scale. When villagers increased their rating of the factor "Human resources," their evaluation of tourism development in My An pottery village increased by 0.120 points, corresponding to an unstandardized correlation coefficient. 0.120 is the value.

Factor F6 has a correlation coefficient of 0.106 and is positively related to the overall rating scale. When villagers increased their rating of the factor "The disappearance of the craft village" by one point, their assessment of My An pottery village's tourism development increased by 0.106 points, corresponding to the correlation coefficient. 0.106 is the unnormalized value.

Factor F7 has a correlation coefficient of 0.098 and is positively related to the overall rating scale. When villagers increased their rating of the factor "Consumption market," their assessment of tourism development in My An pottery village increased by 0.098 points, corresponding to an undetermined correlation coefficient. 0.098 when normalized.

Factor F1 has a correlation coefficient of 0.085 and is positively related to the overall rating scale. When villagers increased their rating of the factor "Tourism resources," their evaluation of tourism development in My An pottery village increased by 0.085 points, corresponding to an undetermined correlation coefficient. The normalization factor is 0.08.

Factor F4 has a correlation coefficient of 0.073 and is positively related to the overall rating scale. When villagers increased their rating of the factor "order and security - environmental sanitation" by one point, their assessment of tourism development in My An pottery village increased by 0.073 points. Correlation coefficients are unnormalized at 0.073.

Factor F2 has a correlation coefficient of 0.057 and is positively related to the overall rating scale. When villagers increased their rating of the factor "Infrastructure - material and technology," their assessment of My An pottery village's tourism development increased by 0.057 points, corresponding to Correlation coefficients are unnormalized at 0.057. (Table 6)

Table 6
Regression Coefficients
Model Not yet Standardized coefficient Standardized coefficient
B Std.Error Beta t Sig. VIF
(Constant) 0,542 0,158 3,432 0,001
Factor 1 0,085 0,036 0,097 2,374 0,018 1,391
Factor 2 0,057 0,027 0,086 2,086 0,038 1,412
Factor 3 0,120 0,042 0,132 2,886 0,004 1,760
Factor 4 0,073 0,033 0,094 2,205 0,028 1,521
Factor 5 0,301 0,039 0,351 7,688 0,000 1,743
Factor 6 0,106 0,036 0,123 2,920 0,004 1,487
Factor 7 0,098 0,041 0,113 2,391 0,017 1,865

Thus, the sum of the normalized regression coefficients of 7 factors=0.996 (table 09). Therefore, factor 5 contributes 35.24%, factor 3 contributes 13.25%, factor 6 contributes 12.35%, factor 7 contributes 11.35%, factor 1 contributes 9, 74%, factor 4 contributes 9.44% and factor 2 contributes 8.63% to tourism development in My An pottery village.

Differences in Factors Affecting Tourism Development in Craft Villages in Terms of Age, Gender, Marital Status, Education Level, Duration of Residence, and Average Monthly Income

According to the data in Table 7, the craft village residents' perceptions of the factors affecting tourism development in My An pottery village range from neutral to agreeable. Which indicates that residents of the craft village are most in agreement on the following factors: the craft village's demise (3.78), the consumer market (3.63), infrastructure - technical skills (3.61), and order and safety. environmental sanitation – security (3,61). Villagers agree the least on the following factors: tourism resources (3.31), human resources (3.41), and tourism promotion and development policies (3.41). According to Table 7, there is no statistically significant difference in age, sex, or level of education between different groups of craft villagers. The distinction exists only between the various groups of craft villagers in terms of marital status, length of residence in the neighborhood, and average monthly income.

Table 7
Comparison of The Level of Assessment of People in Craft Villages on Factors Affecting Tourism Development in My An Pottery Village
Evaluation factor Average (1) Independent variables (2)
Year old Gender Marial status Academic level Residence time Income
Tourism resources 3,31 ns ns ns ns * ns
Infrastructure – material and technology 3,61 ns ns ns ns ns ns
Security order - environmental hygiene 3,61 ns ns *** ns *** ns
Human resources 3,41 ns ns * ns * *
Consumption market 3,63 ns ns ns ns * *
The disappearance of the craft village 3,78 ns ns ns ns ns **
Tourism promotion and development policy 3,41 ns ns ns ns * ns

(1) Likert's scale: from 1-5 rating from strongly disagree to strongly agree

(2) Level of significance P: * P<=0.1, ** P<=0.05, *** P<=0.01, ns: non-significant

As a result of the above analysis, it is clear that different groups of craft villagers differ in terms of marital status, duration of residence in the locality, and average monthly income for various factors. Specifically, the following factors are affecting the development of tourism in My An pottery village:

For the purpose of assessing groups of craft villagers based on their marital status. The results of the analysis indicate that there is a statistically significant difference between the factors "Security order - environmental sanitation" and "Human resources." The assessment of craft villagers on the above two factors ranges from neutral to agree, indicating that the group of unmarried craft villagers agrees more than the married group on these two factors. family.

For the purpose of evaluating groups of craft villagers according to their residence time. The analysis reveals a significant difference in the factors "Tourism resources", "Security order - environmental sanitation", "Human resources", "Consumption market", and "Politics". As can be seen, the assessment of craft village residents on these factors ranges from neutral to agreeable, depending on whether the group of craft village residents has lived there for 21-30 years or longer. exhibited the greatest degree of agreement with the other groups. In general, the assessment of the aforementioned influencing factors in My An pottery village focuses on the group of villagers who have lived there for between 21 and 30 years and those who have lived there for more than 30 years. The reason for this is that the residents of the craft village have been involved in pottery making for a long period of time, and as a result, they have a better understanding of the values and the situation in the craft village, which results in a higher level of appreciation. in comparison to craft villagers, who have a shorter period of local residence.

For the purpose of assessing the impact of factors affecting the development of tourism in My An pottery village on various groups of craft villagers based on their average monthly income. The analysis reveals a significant difference between the variables "Human resources," "Consumption market," and "Death of craft villages." For the factor "Human resources," it can be seen that the assessment of craft villagers ranges from neutral to agreeable, with craft villagers with an income of more than ten million and between three and five million having the most agreeable assessment compared to craft villagers with lower incomes. For the factor "Consumption market," it can be seen that the assessment of craft village people ranges from neutral to agree, with the group of craft village people with an income of 5-7 million and between 3 and 5 million having the highest level of agreement, compared to craft village people with lower incomes. For the factor "The disappearance of craft villages," it can be seen that the assessment of craft village people ranges from neutral to agree, with the group of craft village people earning between $3 and $5 million and over $10 million having the most agreed assessment compared to the other income groups. In general, each factor is rated differently by different income groups; this is because the laborers employed in the ceramic production facilities in the craft villages are primarily seasonal workers who are compensated. Salary varies according to product or number of working days, so the monthly income of each worker in the craft village may vary. As a result, assessment will vary between groups of craft villagers with varying income levels.

In summary, while there are some differences, the craft village residents' assessment of the factors affecting the development of tourism in the My An pottery village ranges from neutral to neutral. As a result, it is critical to prioritize these influencing factors when it comes to developing tourism in My An pottery village.

Conclusions and Recommendations

My An Pottery Village is a one-of-a-kind traditional red pottery village in Vinh Long province and the Mekong Delta, with significant value and potential for exploitation and development of various forms of cultural tourism, particularly DLLN. Simultaneously, the craft village benefits from a convenient location on a major thoroughfare and close proximity to tourist attractions, giving it considerable strength in organizing a sightseeing tour for tourists. It can be said that My An pottery village, with its enormous potential and strengths, will soon become one of the most popular tourist destinations, attracting a large number of tourists, particularly tourists. Mang Thit district, in particular, and Vinh Long province in general attract international tourists. However, those values and strengths remain in their infancy, and their exploitation and incorporation into tourism services remain extremely limited.

The subject of factors affecting tourism development in My An pottery village, Mang Thit district, Vinh Long province, revealed seven factors affecting tourism development in My An pottery village. The most influential factor is "Tourism promotion and development policy." Simultaneously, the author provides some guidelines and solutions for developing tourism in My An pottery village.

Solutions that will aid in the effective exploitation of tourism and conservation of My An pottery village

Solutions to the Promotion and Development of Tourism

Tourism development policy: Departments and local governments must develop tourism development policies, as well as projects aimed at developing specific tourism products and fostering the growth of businesses and communities. development of tourism. Continued advocacy for investment in DLLN development projects in My An pottery village is necessary.

Promote and disseminate tourist information: It is necessary to expand the promotion and dissemination of information and images about My An pottery village through tourism publications, leaflets, fairs, exhibitions, and tourism events. domestically and internationally; integrating promotional activities for craft villages and DLLNs into cultural events, sporting events, conferences, and tourism fairs. Additionally, promoting pottery villages through mass media (TV, video clips, social networking sites, and YouTube), as well as through the websites of the Mang Thit district, the Vinh Long province Department of Culture, Sports, and Tourism, and tourism websites throughout the Mekong Delta. Additionally, it is possible to hold a contest to design tourism logos and slogans for My An pottery village in order to broaden the village's appeal to tourists.

Strengthening ties with tourism-related business units: To best serve tourists' needs, it is critical that tourism business units/establishments collaborate with travel businesses. important. Simultaneously, it is necessary to promote development activities that connect regional, interregional, and national tourism. This enables the organization of more professional and enjoyable visits to the craft village for tourists, as well as the establishment of a stable source of visitors to the craft village.

Investing in Human Capital Development for Tourism

Promote public participation in tourism-related activities: Local people are critical in sustaining and developing craft villages and tourism. As a result, local governments must have policies that support people in terms of capital, raw materials, and other resources, as well as the preservation of craft villages. Increase community awareness of the benefits of DLLN and foster conditions for people to participate actively in tourism service activities (selling regional specialties, providing food services, etc.) and to welcome visitors. Apart from establishing conditions and encouraging participation, it is necessary to prioritize vocational education and training for young workers in order to contribute to the preservation and development of craft villages.

Training human resources for tourism: Local governments should promote and advocate for craft villagers to increase their awareness of the benefits of tourism participation. As a result, human resources must be trained in tourism operations, foreign language communication skills, information technology application in tourism, and tourism business training, among other things, in order to meet the growing demand. International visitors are in abundance.

Solutions for the Preservation of Craft Villages

Local governments should implement incentive policies in conjunction with policies ensuring the welfare of people engaged in pottery making in craft villages in order to encourage and sustain pottery villages.
Proposal to recognize skilled artisans as "Excellent Traditional Artisans," thereby fostering their spirit and enthusiasm for regional traditional pottery.

Open training classes to enhance human resource skills, assist artisans in gaining access to new product design trends, and developing new and improved products to meet market needs. Simultaneously, impart traditional pottery techniques to the younger generation in order to arouse the next generation's passion for pottery making.

Increase Market Share

All levels, departments, and local governments should pay close attention to and coordinate efforts to expand large potential consumer markets so that ceramic products can be consumed by households. Thus, pottery-producing households can maintain a steady source of capital to invest in the craft village's continued development.

Constantly updating the design of ceramic products, orienting new products around consumer preferences, in order to reduce competition between various types of ceramics.

Departments and local governments assist households in developing the tourism market by partnering with travel agencies to bring visitors to the pottery village, which serves as a venue for households to display and sell ceramic souvenirs.

Investment and coordinated development of tourism infrastructure and technical facilities

It is necessary to invest in and develop catering establishments that emphasize regional specialties and adhere to strict standards of quality, hygiene, and food safety; to develop catering establishments (of various types) in collaboration with lodging establishments or independently. Parallel to tourists' dining needs is their need for rest, which is why it is necessary to invest in and build accommodation facilities to serve tourists who require overnight rest. Additionally, it is necessary to construct public restrooms to serve tourists visiting the craft village. Additionally, to facilitate guest pickup, parking lots for tourists are required, which is also critical for the development of local craft village tourism.

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