Journal of Organizational Culture, Communications and Conflict (Print ISSN: 1544-0508; Online ISSN: 1939-4691 )

Editorials: 2020 Vol: 24 Issue: 2

The Emergence of Media Entrepreneurship As A Promising Field of Research

Aidin Salamzadeh, University of Tehran

Abstract

Despite the importance of media entrepreneurship, this field is poorly studied by scholars of entrepreneurship during the past decade. Nevertheless, scholars in the field of media and communication studies- such as Hoag (2008), Ferrier (2013), Khajeheian (2017 a,b), Salamzadeh et al. (2019); Horst & Hitters (2020); Achtenhagen (2020)- have recently put more emphasis on this emerging field. Nevertheless, why this field is interesting? Is there any significant difference between media entrepreneurs and other types of entrepreneurs? What is specific about media entrepreneurship? These are among several open questions in this domain. If one focuses on the particularities of media entrepreneurship, he/she will notice that these entrepreneurs are among the most famous players of the entrepreneurial scenes Salamzadeh & Radovic Markovic, (2018). For instance, founders of Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, and Telegram are among the most famous media entrepreneurs who are titled as "entrepreneurs", "digital entrepreneurs" or "technological entrepreneurs" in entrepreneurship research Tajpour et al., (2019). Their difference could be due to the particularities of media markets as well as [digital] media goods. These entrepreneurs could quickly expand their markets through the Internet and social media platforms without any need to spend a whale of money and time on preparing the physical infrastructure. Instead, their markets could be expanded by engaging more audience from a variety of countries around the Globe. Moreover, [digital] media goods are unique, as most of them are not competitive, and the use of one audience does not limit others from using the same goods. [Digital] media goods are readily producible and expandable. That is to say; media entrepreneurs could quickly produce and publish their goods and services through available online platforms. Media entrepreneurs have easier access to their audience, and this makes them unique. Media entrepreneurs are repeatedly invited to global forums and unions as they can influence a large number of people, and this makes them more involved in socio-political gatherings. Last but not least is the unique business models used by media entrepreneurs (Salamzadeh et al., 2019).

Keywords

Media Entrepreneurship, Media Business Models, Media, Entrepreneurship

Editorial Note

Despite the importance of media entrepreneurship, this field is poorly studied by scholars of entrepreneurship during the past decade. Nevertheless, scholars in the field of media and communication studies- such as Hoag (2008), Ferrier (2013), Khajeheian (2017 a,b), Salamzadeh et al. (2019); Horst & Hitters (2020); Achtenhagen (2020)- have recently put more emphasis on this emerging field. Nevertheless, why this field is interesting? Is there any significant difference between media entrepreneurs and other types of entrepreneurs? What is specific about media entrepreneurship? These are among several open questions in this domain. If one focuses on the particularities of media entrepreneurship, he/she will notice that these entrepreneurs are among the most famous players of the entrepreneurial scenes Salamzadeh & Radovic Markovic, (2018). For instance, founders of Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, and Telegram are among the most famous media entrepreneurs who are titled as "entrepreneurs", "digital entrepreneurs" or "technological entrepreneurs" in entrepreneurship research Tajpour et al., (2019). Their difference could be due to the particularities of media markets as well as [digital] media goods. These entrepreneurs could quickly expand their markets through the Internet and social media platforms without any need to spend a whale of money and time on preparing the physical infrastructure. Instead, their markets could be expanded by engaging more audience from a variety of countries around the Globe. Moreover, [digital] media goods are unique, as most of them are not competitive, and the use of one audience does not limit others from using the same goods. [Digital] media goods are readily producible and expandable. That is to say; media entrepreneurs could quickly produce and publish their goods and services through available online platforms. Media entrepreneurs have easier access to their audience, and this makes them unique. Media entrepreneurs are repeatedly invited to global forums and unions as they can influence a large number of people, and this makes them more involved in socio-political gatherings. Last but not least is the unique business models used by media entrepreneurs (Salamzadeh et al., 2019).

This editorial note unravels a series of opportunities for future researchers as it draws their attention to some of the significant emerging streams of research, including:

1. Strategic media entrepreneurship

2. Female media entrepreneurship

3. Corporate media entrepreneurship

4. Digital media entrepreneurship

5. Platformization of media entrepreneurship

6. Contextual media entrepreneurship

7. Urban/rural media entrepreneurship and

8. New technology-based media entrepreneurship

Besides, we invite interested scholars to submit their research papers related to these/or any relevant topics to the Journal of Organizational Culture, Communications and Conflict.

References

Achtenhagen, L. (2020). Entrepreneurial orientation?An overlooked theoretical concept for studying media firms. Nordic Journal of Media Management, 1(1), 7-21.

Ferrier, M.B. (2013). Media entrepreneurship: Curriculum development and faculty perceptions of what students should know. Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, 68(3), 222-241.

Hoag, A. (2008). Measuring media entrepreneurship. The International Journal on Media Management, 10(2), 74-80.

Horst, S.O., & Hitters, E. (2020). Digital Media Entrepreneurship: Implications for Strategic Identity Work and Knowledge Sharing of Beginning Entrepreneurs. Nordic Journal of Media Management, 1(1), 23-44.

Khajeheian, D. (2017 a). Media entrepreneurship: A consensual definition. AD-minister, 30, 91-113.

Khajeheian, D. (2017 b). An introduction to entrepreneurship and innovation in media markets. Global Media Journal?Canadian Edition, 10(1), 1-8.

Khajeheian, D., & Tadayoni, R. (2016). User innovation in public service broadcasts: creating public value by media entrepreneurship. International Journal of Technology Transfer and Commercialisation, 14(2), 117-131.

Salamzadeh, A., & Radovic Markovic, M. (2018). Shortening the learning curve of media start-ups in accelerators: Case of a developing country. In Evaluating media richness in organizational learning (pp. 36-48). IGI Global.

Salamzadeh, A., Kawamorita Kesim, H., & Karami, M. (2019, March). Media Business Models: A Holistic Approach. In Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference of Research in Innovation and Technology, Tehran, Iran.

Salamzadeh, A., Radovic Markovic, M., & Masjed, S.M. (2019). The effect of media convergence on exploitation of entrepreneurial opportunities. AD-minister, (34), 59-76.

Tajpour, M., Salamzadeh, A., & Hosseini, E. (2019). Social Media and Entrepreneurship in Creative Industries. In Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference of Research in Innovation and Technology, Tehran: Iran.